How do you evangelise a secular country?

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How do you evangelise a secular country?

Noey
On the surface, its a simple question but one we seem to be failing quite miserably at. What do you think? post your suggestions and comments.
Noey
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Lovelyladybird2000
I have been evangelizing to friends and collegues all my life and the key is to accept all people as children of God, loved by God and invite them to church or bible meetings so they can discover God for themselves.
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Noey
What if they have no interest in church or God? what then?
Noey
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Lovelyladybird2000
then they will not come..you can shake the dust of your feet an try someone new
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Noey
But that brings me back to the original question, how do you evangelise? Secularist may not be interested in organised religion but that dosen't mean they are not spiritual or at least think of a higher being. Surely we can't just dust off our feet and move on?
Noey
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

lovelyladybird2000
We can't convert people only plant seeds the holy spirit does the converting
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Noey
I wasen't really talking about converting but about evangelising. How best do we plant seeds?
Noey
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

lovelyladybird2000
be an example of Christ to them
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Noey
OK fair enough, can't argue there but based on the level of Christianity in our country, most of us (organised religion) are definately failing to be an example. If the trend continues then our country would most certainly become fully secularised just like France!!
Noey
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

lovelyladybird2000
I have always found it interesting to see how church people interact with secular people.

1) Bible bash and try to convert
2) Befriend and find common ground
3) Keep away in fear of contamination
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Vincy
 I think that if we live our lives as examples sometimes we may not even have to approach people.  They would see the difference in you and possible approach you first.  It is amazing, but once we let God and the Holy spirit work through us God will truly be glorified.
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Noey
So does the fact that we have such a poor success rate here in the UK mean that we don't have God working through us or are we trying to preach the wrong message?
Noey
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Noey
If we are to witness to our community, what are some suggested methods? Lets start listing them so that we can take it forward in implement.

Noey
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

lovelyladybird2000
Cultivating friendships goes a long way.
ie.
Show interest in people.
Tell them what God has done for you.
Invite them to dinner
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Noey
So is one of your suggestion having some sort of dinner? how can we do something similar on a church basis?
Noey
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

The Panda
yes, our own lives are very good examples to witness to others.
but there used to be a time when you could say that our standards
seperated us from the 'world' - now many indigenous people only
see black people - they dont see christians - they dont see love
- they only see that we are trying to force Jesus down their throats
- doesnt matter if we live a 'Godly' life, we r still black / asian / indian
in their eyes along with all the stereotypical societal propoganda that
goes with that......and whatever is said and done, there is much
silent racism in this country - not for everyone mind you, but a large
majority,

We have black Churches, we dont even attempt to appeal to the 'whites' of this
country, our services are much too long, too full of Ellen G White, too much preaching
and not enough being Christlike.   Many of the people around us can point to
people in our own churches and say 'WHY DO I NEED TO GO TO CHURCH - I LIVE
A BETTER LIFE THAN YOUR OWN SO CALLED CHRISTIANS'

We need to have meetings to talk aboiut HEALTH, DOGS, HORSES, CARS, COMPUTERS
MONEY, BABIES, CLOTHING, PARENTING - these will bring the people to us, because they are things
that locals want to know about, and then let them see Jesus through those topics

When they cant put food in their mouths, do you really think they want to hear about Christianity being
preached.

Have we EVER converted an intelligent indiginous person in WCSDA or Micklefield in the last few years
who was totally COLD called ie knew nothing about SDA but listened to us and then say
yes what they are living is true and it is right......i may be completely wrong on this, but please someone correct me - it would be a good thing to be corrected positively on this
The Panda
I told my wife that a husband is like a fine wine; he gets better with age. The next day, she locked me in the cellar.
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Lovelyladybird2000
This post was updated on .
God loves variety and diversity that is why he created the many different people in this world, all are in need of salvation. I grew up with the so called 'black church' culture and now as I am older I cannot avoid mixing  with the 'white english/european' culture and there definate and obvious cultural differences in teachin/learning styles, worship differences, but one God and one Savour which is Jesus Christ. I feel fortunate that I can worship with either culture as long as my saviour is lifted high and worshiped in spirit and in truth I am happy.



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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

Noey
While it is good that you can do that, how do we bring the whole church along with that idea? How do we change policy to make it all inclusive?
Noey
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

marc
We have to leave it to God to know how to deal with Europe. Europe has to a large extent turned its back on Him; and that does I suppose go back to the emergence of rationalism which seems to have finally got through to the media and our schools since the early fifties or should we say the early sixties.
What is startling is that perhaps we are wrong to think that men and women have turned away from God - perhaps it is only the church from which people have turned away!

But we do live in a society which is deeply suspicious of the supernatural as taught by the church throughout history. There is just too much tomfoolery and playing about with God amongst many Christians today. We do not seem to take God seriously enough. One wonders whether the Christian church takes into consideration Paul's advice that our our bodies and our minds need to be totally renewed (Romans 12:1-2). Rationalism has failed us profoundly - humanity needs to be courageous and step outside the dark secular square where we find ourselves today; it offers us nothing not because nothing is there beyond ourselves, but because we no longer exercise our capacity to reach out beyond.

It was interesting when I recently visited South America where rationalism never has been the leitmotif. There is much wrong there, however it was a great experience to hear people wish me God's blessings, where they still make the sign of the cross in deference to their faith in spite of their own weaknesses and where the churches are used a good deal more than here. There is almost a church on every other corner.

I shall never forget visiting the Cartago cathedral which has replaced the one destroyed in the earthquake some years ago, at the time when my friend's grandfather was governor of that province. While in the cathedral I came across a man who was kneeling in front of a statue of Jesus. He was involved in a lively conversation with the Man behind the image, and I noticed his wife, daughter and son standing idly by to one side while he 'got on' with his interlocution with the great God beyond. What surprised me was that, after pouring his heart out with all manner of complaints - perhaps a modern-day Job - he rose to rejoin his family; perfectly normal and with all five senses in good working order. I had wondered at his sanity until I realised that it was perhaps I who lacked sanity in my timidity at embracing such a close relationship with His Lord!
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Re: How do you evangelise a secular country?

marc
In reply to this post by Noey
"God loves variety and diversity that is why he created the many different people in this world, all are in need of salvation. I grew up with the so called 'black church' culture and now as I am older I cannot avoid mixing  with the 'white english/european' culture and there definate and obvious cultural differences in teachin/learning styles, worship differences, but one God and one Savour which is Jesus Christ. I feel fortunate that I can worship with either culture as long as my saviour is lifted high and worshiped in spirit and in truth I am happy. " - Lovelyladybird 2000

______________________________________________________

How interesting that you mention the two cultures which have both had a strong influence on the SDA church in the United Kingdom. I cannot forget how, while I was working for the church in Africa, a veteran missionary of some thirty years - and an Englishman to boot - had mentioned to me in passing that the presence of Caribbean SDA church members in the UK had been the cause of a decline in white membership. I wondered much about what he had said as he had told me this at a time when the South African government was beginning negotiations with Nelson Mandela after he had been moved off Robin Island to Polsmoor prison just near Rondebosch. I wondered what shape the church would take in South Africa when the ANC finally came to power.

It also reminded me of an earlier time when I worshipped at a small SDA church in the northern Cape Province - back in 1972. We were a small enclave of white SDA's worshipping in a 'whites only' type of church. I had raised the matter at a board meeting, of combining the local white church with the Montshiwa church - which was a vibrant and very active black church in the township nearby. On a number of occasions an SDA Tswana chieftainess - a delightful lady and a sister-in-law to one of the distinguished founding members of the ANC - had invited us to her home after the Sabbath service. We enjoyed her and her family's hospitality and we were always reluctant to leave after sunset. Sadly the board turned down the possibility of the small white church ever joining together to worship with the black church at that time. It was deeply saddening and in fact the white church lost so much as a consequence.

Coming back to the UK after an absence of more than a half-century I could not help noticing that the church on this small island was indeed mostly 'black' and that too set me to remembering what my missionary friend had said a number of years back. There is no doubt that culture does count - whether we like it or not - and yet cross-cultural worship is so beautiful and fruitful, and we can learn so much from that experience when we worship together.

The SDA church has faced many challenges where it comes to black/white relations; I have seen that in South Africa and I have read much about it from Ellen White letters, and documents originating from her pen.  The fact that she had so much to say about the matter does indicate that it was an issue in her day, and looking at some of the contemporary comments on the web it seems to still be the case in some areas today.

Can we learn lessons from the South African model which has emerged - perhaps it is too early - but how will the multi-cultural church in South Africa reach out to the whites of the future. I am aware that black Africans are in the majority deeply spiritual by nature and their rootedness lies within a recognition that God is present not transcendentally only, but intimately in their everyday life. Their knowledge that God plays an active part in history is not only the province of Christians - it goes far back to their own spirituality. Perhaps African spirituality can give us an answer to our own dilemma; perhaps their acknowledgement that God is present and imminent is what Europe needs as a whole. An interesting insight into the spirituality of black Africans from a black South African point of view is found in this fascinating thesis on the struggles of the bishop when faced with a very westernised form of Christianity. The thesis is by PETER TSHOBISO MTUZE and is well worth interesting - and will also probably shock many of us and might perhaps just cause us to rethink our own attitudes to other people's spirituality. The thesis - which is quite readable - is found here http://uir.unisa.ac.za/bitstream/handle/10500/2420/thesis.pdf;jsessionid=830164DF04920B6827BE1852DCD6FF66?sequence=1
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